Interior Canada

Posted by Miro

Here’s a long post of consisting of different snippets written over the last few days:


The bus has a new passenger record: nine travelers including me and Ehren. Ehren and I both met groups of people at the Hostels we were staying at who decided to come with us to Whistler. Here we leave behind three of our travelers, and 4 will continue on with us to Jasper.

Of our seven travelers, Jo and Dee are staying to work in Whistler. Susan is going to visit with them for a few days. Staying on the bus with us are Adam, Charley, Alison and Michelle. Adam and Charley are Brits and Alison and Michelle are from Scotland.

The trip up to Whistler was uneventful. I sat in the back where we were stowing people on the couch. I haven’t traveled for any length of time in the back. It’s quieter and the couch is comfortable. I’ll have to do it more often.

We all went out for drinks in Whistler village this evening after dinning on pasta and sauce in the bus. Cooking for 6 is going to be a trick. Our propane stove takes a long time to heat up enough water to boil pasta for that many. Given how small the space is, I think an efficient cooking process demands a tremendous amount of planning, more planning than I’m will to do.

It fills a dream of mine to have the bus packed with random people we’ve met on the road. We’ve been half-heartedly trying to hook up with a band that we could ferry to a gig since at least Atlanta. This is much better.


My attempt to master a Canadian accent has been totally shot to hell by the number of accents currently on the bus. I like the way certain words sound in British or Scottish, but it always sounds silly when I try to say them that way. Even so, I think I’ll being calling this town Whis-la for the rest of my days.

Alison and Michelle have it particularly bad. I start chuckling in the middle of their stories for what must look like no reason. Is it bad to be amused when someone un-ironically uses phrases I learned from Scrooge McDuck? Michelle referred playing Connect 4 with her grandfather “when I was a wee girl.”

Between half-wanting to pick up an accent and not being able to get my accents straight, I sound like Madonna an her faux British affectation about half the time. Ehren now refers to anything suspect as “dodgy.”


Lillooet is a German enclave in the middle of the arid interior valley of Canada. Trapped between two mountain ranges, this is one of the hottest and driest areas of Canada. For some reason that attracts Germans. The RV park here had all the signs translated into German. I asked the guy at the next site for help finding the dump station. When I realized he only spoke German, I thanked him: “Danke.”

He asked, in German, if I spoke German. I said No, then said the only two words of German I know (Danke and Bitte) and proceed to make an I’m-finished sign. He took this to mean that I did know German and proceed to talk to me in German for a few minutes. I nodded, said please and thank you and walked away.


We’re sitting in a German bakery/Internet cage in downtown Lillooet. The place is packed with a German/British tour group. We have taken over the computer room which has 3 computers in it. Ehren and I have both plugged in out laptops. Ehren’s Computer is perched on top of the scanner.

Travel with six proceeds smoothly. Everyone seems to know how to travel in groups: be flexible, help out when appropriate, get out of the way when appropriate. Happily, I’ve discovered this means that I can go take a shower and come back with dinner already cooked.


Check out Charley’s blog of her Canada Trip at:

www.CharleyCanada.blogspot.com


I’m keeping a list of English slang I’ve picked up.

Lilo (UK): An inflatable mattress, most commonly used to refer to those thing you float on in the pool, but they use it to refer to our air mattress as well

Mozzy (UK): short for mosquito

Knackered (UK): tired. Really, really tired

Shits (UK): someone or thing that pisses you off. As in “He really gives me the shits.”